Mimino Travel

Racha - Lechkhumi

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Racha - Lechkhumi

Racha is a wonderful highland region of western Georgia, situated in the upper Rioni river valley and surrounded by the Greater Caucasus mountains. Georgians like to joke about the Rachvelis, the inhabitants of the mountainous region of Racha in the North-West. They like to make fun of them for being slow, a bit simple and so on, but when you go to Racha, you’ll understand that maybe it’s all out of envy.

Svaneti-Mestia

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Svaneti

The highest constantly populated place in Europe, Svaneti really has to be seen to be believed – and first time travelers can be forgiven for considering that they have faltered into to a big-budget Hollywood fantasy epic. Svaneti is highland territory, with a few peaks rising to over 5000 meters, and some of the most stimulating mountaineering anywhere in the world. The warm, wet winds flowing from the nearby Black Sea, moderate climate make pleasant summers and surprisingly mild winters. Lower in the deep valleys, this humidity produces what is known as a moderate rainforest, and in the highlands the mountain slopes are covered with pines and hornbeams. But aside from the staggering natural beauty, the region’s real wealth is the culture of its people – the Svans. With their own language, related to but separate from Georgian, their own old traditions and crafts, and their enormous sense of humor, Svans have always been a proudly independent people.

Shida Kartli

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Shida Kartli

Shida, or ‘inner’ Kartli, is Georgia’s heartland in a lot of ways. At the geographic center of the country, the area is also a main agricultural and industrial center, and is filled with hidden valleys and mysterious cultural treasures. Spreading out both sides of the Mtkvari valley, Shida Kartli takes in the foothills of the Greater Caucasus, covered in fruit gardens, as well as the forested Trialeti Range. The region’s capital is Gori, popular as the birthplace of soviet despot Joseph Stalin, or as people used to call him, Soso Jugashvili.

Kvemo-Kartli

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Kvemo-Kartli

The south Georgian area of Kvemo Kartli is one of Georgia’s treasury place that lacks attention. Although most of the region is just a short ride from Tbilisi, and is full of natural beauty and antique memorials, many travelers ignore it for more outstanding parts of Georgia. This is wrong, as the area is a charming mix of nationalities, climates and topographies. The plains south of Tbilisi are abundant by agriculture, and are homeland to many Azerbaijan communities.

Samtskhe-Javakheti

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samtskhe-javakheti

Samtskhe-Javakheti is one of the biggest areas of Georgia. Its entire area includes 6 421 sq/km and its capital and administrative center is the town Akhaltsikhe. The region is ethnically various with a mixture of Georgians, Armenians, Greeks, Ossetians, Russians and Ukrainians. Samtskhe-Javakheti is an ancient historic territory of Georgia and is thought to be the cradle of Georgian culture. The ancient Georgian tribes lived in this area. St. Nino of Capadoccia, the converter of Georgia to christianity, entered the country with a holy cross made of vine stems tied by her own hair via the foggy mountains of Javakheti. According to literary data and folk narration, it is the homeland of the most well-known Georgian poet – Shota Rustaveli – the place where the unique masterwork of Georgian culture were born. Samtskhe-Javakheti area includes a part of Meskheti, Javakheti and Tori.

Kakheti

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Kakheti

In this country of wine-lovers, everybody knows that the best wines come from the fertile eastern part of Georgia, named by Dumas “the garden country of Kakheti.” Actually, few things have changed since his time – horse-drawn carts are an often sight on the silent country roads, the fields are dotted with haystacks, and the sweet grapes are still cropped by hand. But wine is not the only thing that Kakheti can offer – the rich history of the area has left us some of Georgia’s greatest examples of church architecture. Moreover friendliness hospitality of people will prove you why a visit to Kakheti is always a pleasure.

Tusheti

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Tusheti

Walked into Georgia’s far northeast corner, with Chechnya to its north and Dagestan to its east, Tusheti is an increasingly famous summer hiking region but is one of the country’s the most distant and charming and intact high-mountain areas.

Khevsureti

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Khevsureti

Located in the mountains of the High Caucasus, right on the Chechen boundary, Khevsureti is one of Georgia's most distant, unchanged and exciting regions. Out of reach during the winter, Khevsureti is completely separate world, where the men wore chain mail until the 1930s and ancient pre-Christian traditions still are preserved; and among the high mountains, the rocky canyons and the forsaken forts, you feel like you've stepped into scenery that most worldwide famous poets would be proud to call their own.

Imereti

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Imereti

Imereti is an area in Western Georgia. It includes 11 districts and one autonomous city of Kutaisi. Imereti noticeably distinguishes from the Central Georgia, even by color. Imereti is very green. Beautiful pine woods start as soon as soon as you enter the area from Surami side. The climate is humid here and quite staffy.

Guria

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Guria

Citrus groves, snowy mountains, sandy beaches and complaisant hosts – Guria suggests all these to you. Music and singing play a significant role in Gurian culture, where people are used to have conversations in humorous verse. The astonishing, Krimanchuli singing style comes from here, when up to seven various voices harmonize in a chaotic yet awe inspiring feat of musical agility – you have never heard anything like it. Another Gurian favorite and special song is Naduri, which is performed while working in the fields. Traditionally, the song would last for longer than an hour and more than 200 people sang it together during work.

Samegrelo

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Samegrelo

Warm summers, moderate winters, exotic fruit, spicy dishes and great hosts – Samegrelo is an area that is difficult to leave. Also recognized as Mingrelia or Mengrelia, this western part, watered by the Black Sea, is homeland to the Megrelians, a differential sub group of Georgians who have their own language, and traditions. The region is a natural cornucopia, full with mandarin groves, tea plantations, chilies, kiwi fruits and wine that has a taste of garden flowers. The wet streets of Zugdidi, Samegrelo’s capital, house some of the Georgia’s best cooks. Megrelian food, much more spicy than in the other part of Georgia, contains dishes that have a taste of curry such as bazhe and satsivi, as well as maize and cheese tacky kindness called elargi, and a local version of Khatchapuri thought to be the best.

Adjara

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Adjara

Alhough Georgians are proud of their entire country, there’s a particular place in their soul for the Black Sea region of Adjara. Neighboring with Turkey, the Independent Republic of Adjara, as the region is officially known, is a land of intact beaches, high mountains and delicious food. Although it is on the shore of the Black Sea the waters in the area are cerulean, and very warm. Sea season there begins from May and lasts till October, sometimes longer. The capital of Adjara is Batumi. Amazing streets filled with palm trees and beautiful 19th century architecture, it feels more like the Caribbean than Eastern Europe. Modern cinemas, theatres, historical museums, an Opera House and Circus, as well as the longest boulevard in Europe make Adjara look gorgeous. It is a 19th century resort which has firmly saved in the contemporary century, CNN has described the last several years in Batumi as a “wonder”, with big international names like Sheraton and Hayatt enabling the economic transformation of the city. Nightclubs, casinos, beautiful gardens and entertaining parks, small boutique shops and cafés mean that there’s always a good time to be spent in Batumi. It has always been a highly distinctive place. One century ago the town hosted one of the world first oil pipelines, which belonged to the Nobel brothers, and since then it has attracted people from the whole Georgia, including Jews, Armenians, Russians, Greeks and Turks.

 

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